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7 Signs a Loved One Might Be Ready for Assisted Living

7 Signs a Loved One Might Be Ready for Assisted Living

September 5, 2017 Nursing Home Abuse 0 Comments

doctor comforts elderly woman in nursing home It’s one of the most emotionally-charged discussions families will have: telling a loved one that they should no longer be living alone, and would be better off in an assisted living facility. When faced with such a life-changing transition, many seniors feel threatened, frustrated and even frightened at the prospect of losing their independence.

While many aging parents may continue to lead a healthy, productive life well into their 70’s and 80’s, others may struggle with the most basic of daily tasks. No one looks forward to placing their parent or loved one in a residential living facility, but there are times when this is the best option for their safety, wellbeing and ongoing medical needs.

7 signs it might be time for assisted living

The decision to move a family member into a nursing home or assisted living facility may be based on a number of factors ranging from dementia-induced impairment to problems with mobility, incontinence or hygiene.

The following examples are early warning signs that it may be time to explore assisted care living.

  1. They fall more frequently and are having difficulty getting around the home, i.e. climbing stairs.
  2. Increased difficulty managing normal daily activities like getting dressed, bathing, shopping, washing laundry and cleaning the house
  3. Changes in personal hygiene become obvious, whether they forgot to shower or now find it too difficult to bathe or brush their teeth
  4. They rarely leave the house and have few active friendships. Be wary of social isolation, which can be dangerous for the infirm and elderly.
  5. They show increased signs of cognitive decline — forgetting things more frequently, becoming easily confused or getting lost in their own communities. Dementia is a progressive disease that only worsens with time.
  6. Their health is deteriorating and they have chronic conditions such as Alzheimer’s or COPD that will soon require round-the-clock care
  7. Emergency situations are becoming increasingly common, whether they forgot to turn the stove off and triggered the the fire alarm, crashed their car, or forgot to take their heart medication

Nursing home abuse attorney in Louisiana

Assisted living centers and nursing homes can provide quality care to aging elders who are no longer able to lead an independent life. However, statistics on abuse, neglect and exploitation in these facilities are incredibly disheartening. According to recent reports, an estimated 10 percent of all seniors experience some form of elder abuse every year in the United States.

Due to cognitive decline, many of these victims are unable to communicate the harm sustained, which is why it’s important for family members to take an active role in monitoring their loved one’s physical and emotional wellbeing. In the event neglect or wrongdoing has occurred and a family member or loved one is mistreated, nursing home caregivers, facility owners and other staff may be held liable in court.

Bart Bernard is a highly skilled nursing home abuse lawyer who represents clients throughout southern Louisiana, including Lafayette, Baton Rouge and Lake Charles. If you suspect elder abuse or neglect, we encourage you to reach out for a free and confidential consultation by dialing 1-888-GET-BART.

Additional Resources on When Assisted Living Should be Considered:

  1. Caring.com, 11 Signs It Might Be Time for Assisted Living https://www.caring.com/articles/signs-its-time-for-assisted-living
  2. US News, Decide if a Nursing Home Is Necessary http://health.usnews.com/health-news/best-nursing-homes/articles/2009/03/11/figure-out-whether-a-nursing-home-is-needed
  3. Focus on the Family, When a Nursing Home Must Be Considered http://www.focusonthefamily.com/lifechallenges/life-transitions/becoming-your-loved-ones-caregiver/when-a-nursing-home-has-to-be-considered


Last modified: September 5, 2017